Saturday, January 21, 2012

Our Truckenmiller Line Through Daniel Ward Truckenmiller




Our Direct Line

Hans Michael Truckenmiller  1690 – 1777
married
Margaretha Vogel 1693 – 1720

married
Catharina Schambach 1718 - 1793 
*Immigrating Ancestors

married
Anna Maria Kerchner  1763-1843


married
 Eva Mary Schwartz

married
Mary Schmeck 1807-1876

married
Mary Elizabeth Berger 1842-1920

married
Hattie Welsh 1873-1936

Ward Welsh Truckenmiller 1908-1970
married
Thelma Clara Brown 1908-1992

Charles Frederick Truckenmiller 
married
Patsy Ann Smith (Living)

Daniel Ward Truckenmiller 
married
Heather Alice Sulouff (adopted by a Gehrer)


An Extremely Rough Draft Of
Our Truckenmiller Lineage
by Heather (Sulouff) Truckenmiller

Sebastian Truckenmiller, immigrant from Germany, was the son of Hans Michael Truckenmiller born 07 Dec 1690  at N. Kraichgau, Kirchardt, Baden-Wurtemburg, Germany, died  07 Oct 1717 in Bernwagen Germay.  Hans Michael married Margaretha abt 1714.   The church records at Kirchardt Lutheran, Berwagen,  record a second marriage for Margaretha, after Michael’s death.

“Kirchardt Lutheran- At Bernwagen, Hans Bernhardt Gomer, son of Georg michael Gomer of adelshoffen, a shoemaker, had married 9 feb 1720 Margaretha, a widow of the late Hans Michael Truckenmiller.  (Truckenmiller D. in Bernwagen 7 oct 1717,aged 26 years and 10 months, their marriage not found there.)”




Generation 1 – The Voyage Here

The vast majority of Palantine immigration ships in Philadelphia between 1727 and 1742 sailed from Rotterdam.  Ships from the continent bound for England’s North American Colonies were required to visit an English port to register their cargo before crossing the Atlantic Ocean.  Passage between England and Philadelphia took between 58 and 90 days.  Two to three months!

Sebastian is found on the ship list for the John and William (Pink), leaving Rotterdam, stopping at Dover, and finally arriving in Philadelphia on   October 17th 1732.  there were 106 people listed on board, 61 of them Palentines.

pink is one of two different types of ship.

The first was a small, flat-bottomed ship with a narrow stern; the name derived from the Italian word pinco. It was used primarily in the Mediterranean Sea as a cargo ship.

In the Atlantic Ocean the word pink was used to describe any small ship with a narrow stern, having derived from the Dutch word pincke. Although they had a large cargo capacity, they were generally square rigged and therefore slow and sluggish to handle. However, they had better maneuverability in shallow waters than some similar classes of ship. They were most often used for short-range missions in protected channels, as both merchantmen and warships.
(Wikipedia)

"At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, October 17th, 1732. Sixty one Palatines, who with their families, making in all One hundred and sixty nine persons, were imported in the Pink John & William of Sunderland, Constable Tymberton, Master, from Rotterdam, but last from Dover, as by Clearance thence." From the Minutes of the Provincial Council, printed in Colonial Records, Vol. III, p.466.
A Philadelphia newspaper report of October 19, 1732 reports that during the journey, the ship was taken over by passengers dissatisfied with the conditions, the deaths by starvation, and the length of the voyage.  A total of 44 passengers died, including Magdalena Truckenmiller, age 1.
"Sunday last arrived here Captain Tymberton, in 17 weeks from Rotterdam, with 220 Palatines - 44 died in their passage. About three weeks ago, the passengers dissatisfied with the length of the voyage, were so imprudent as to make a mutiny, and, being the stronger party, have ever since had the government of the vessel, giving orders from among themselves to the captain and sailors, who were threatened with death in case of disobedience. Thus, having sight of land, they carried the vessel twice backwards and forwards between our capes and Virginia, looking for a place to go ashore, they knew not where. At length they compelled the sailors to cast the anchor near Cape May, and eight of them took the boat by force and went ashore; from whence they have been five days coming up by land to this place, where they found the ship arrived. Those concerned in taking the boat are committed to prison."
Text: As published in the Pennsylvania Gazette, the 4th newspaper in America, established by Benjamin Franklin in 1728 - now the Saturday Evening Post.
Sebastian does not appear again until 1750, when he receives a land grant of 40 acres in Bucks county.  Is it possible he was in jail?  Note also that he is referred to as “Captain Truckenmiller”.  If indeed it was him, and not his son who served in the Revolutionary war, he was only a private, so it is unlikely the term Captain came from his service there.  Is it  possible he was called Captain because of his involvement in stealing the boat?  
Or did Sebastian, like many other immigrants, simply arrive with no money and upon arrival was sold  to pay for his voyage?  
In 1758 there is record of Sebastian selling a horse.  In 1759 his name appears on a petition, along with other area families, complaining of a road laid out in the township that would cut through their properties and ruin their lands.  Another of the signers of this petition was George Schambach, bearing the same last name as Sebastian’s wife.  
Sebastian was listed as a cordwainer when he sold his land to their son Jacob, a millwright, in 1788.  

Upper Milford Twp.
In 1761, 1762, 1772, 1773, 1775, 1776, and 1781 Gary Truckenmiller has found Sebastian on the tax list for Upper Milford twp. Upper Milford twp was a part of Northampton County, until 1812, when it became a part of the newly formed Lehigh county.  

Daniel Rupp, in an informative Hisotry of Lehigh county (1845), includes this description of Upper Milford twp:

 “ Upper Milford is bounded on the north-east by Salisbury township and Upper Saucon, south-east by Bucks county, on the west by Montgomery and Berks counties, and north-west by Lower Macunjy township. It forms almost a square. The surface of this township is considerably diversified, but generally hilly, and in some places very rugged or broken. being crossed by the South Mountain, sending forth spurs, especially towards the south. Iron ore abounds on the mountain. The soil is principally gravel and red shale, and upon the whole, pretty well cultivated, and more than ordinarily productive; it is watered by a branch of the Perkiomen and Upper Saucon creeks. The north branch of the Perkiomen rising in this township, flows by a southren course, (uniting with the east branch in Perkiomen township, Montgomery county) for about thirty miles, through Montgomery county, and falls into the river Schuylkill, above Pawling’s Ford, six miles above Norristown. Upper Saucon creek, rising in this township, and running north-eastwardly, falls into the Lehigh river on the south side, about two miles below Freemansburg, in Northampton county. These streams afford many good mill seats. This township contains seven grist mills, six saw mills, one fulling mill, one oil mill, two powder mills, several tanneries, and a few distilleries, and one furnace, owned by Messrs. Hunter and Miller. There are two churches in this township and several villages”

In 1790 Sebastian Truckenmiller, the emigrant, lived in Upper Milford, Northampton (now Lehigh) Co., Pa., had wife, but no children left at home.

Sebastian’s will was written in 1793, and he died in 1795.  His estate was not settled until 1801.  

In his will he specifies that he does not want his books and possessions sold at public sale, but rather distributed among his children, and he makes mention of a home he bought for George, and that the house is to remain George’s and be passed on to his heirs.   David Strauss and Jacob Truckenmiller are named executors and given power of attorney.  

Sebastian is buried near in Upper Milford township, Lehigh Co., Pa, on what was once the Jacob Nuss farm and is now a housing development.  The Koch School house was nearby.

His tombstone reads: (original text on left, rough translation on right)




Hier ruhet
Sebastian Truckenmiller
Geboren den 1 Aug. 1715,
Gestorben den 1st Feb.
1795 Alt. 79 Jahr, 6 m.
Leichten Text Elmaz 26, 19-20.

Hier ruhet
Catharina Truckenmiller,
ein geborene Schmuck-
brucken geboren den 1st Jenner,
1719 gestorben d. 30 Sept.
1793. Alt 74 jabr 9 m.
7 da. Lied Las die
todten auferstehen den
letzen tage.
Text 2 Tim. 4-7 and 8.
Herein Rests
Sebastian Truckenmiller
Born the 1 Aug 1715
Died The 1st Feb 1795
old 79 year, 6 m.
(Leichten means “to rise to victory”, but I have no idea what Elmaz refers to)

Herein Rests
Catharina Truckenmiller
A born Schmuckenbrucken
Born the 1st January 1719
Died 30 Sept 1793
Old 74 year 9 month 7 days
Song Reading them
todten rise him
letzen meets




II Timothy 4:7-8 reads “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith:
 Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day: and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.”
Although I can find no translation for the word Elmaz, if we use the assumption that this is a biblical text, and look at which books of the bible have 26 chapters, then eliminate the ones with less than 20 verses in the 26th chapter, we are only left with a few books.  Most of the remaining would make no sense in this context, but Isaiah 26 is a likely fit:
 19Thy dead men shall live, together with my dead body shall they arise. Awake and sing, ye that dwell in dust: for thy dew is as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out the dead.
 20Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee: hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast.

Generation #2

Floyd’s History of Northumberland County gives this accounting:

“Jacob Truckenmiller, evidently son of Sebastian, was born Aug. 29, 1759, in lower Berks county, and came to Northumberland county before the Revolution, settling in Delaware township, where his descendants still live. He was the pioneer of the family in this immediate locality, and being a millwright and miller by calling built the original Truckenmiller mill, selecting the site now owned by his great-grandson, Valentine S. Truckenmiller. He died Aug. 23, 1823, at McEwensville and is buried there, in the old upper cemetery. In religion he was a Lutheran. His account, entered Sept. 9, 1823, in Will Book 2, page 442, mentions sons Jacob, Solomon, George, Samuel, and also Mrs. Mary Truckenmiller, probably his wife. The executors were Solomon Truckenmiller and Henry Reader. The account was filed in the Register's office. As shown by tombstone records, Jacob's wife was named Annamaria, and she was born Jan. 16, 1763, and died July 27, 1843. Their children were: Solomon, mentioned below; Jacob, born March 22, 1790, who died April 15, 1880 (his wife, Sarah, died Oct. 3, 1873, aged seventy-six years, one month, fifteen days); George; and Samuel, born in 1803, who died in 1883 (his wife, Sarah, born in 1805, died in 1895). “






Generation #3

In 1840, Solomon, Jacob, and Edmund are all listed on the same census sheet, in Turbot Twp (Delware Twp not yet existing), Northumberland County.  

From Floyd’s History Of Northumberland County:
“Jacob E. Truckenmiller (son of Jacob) of Company B, 131st Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, died in hospital at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 15, 1882, aged thirty-five years, nine months, twenty-two days. “









Generation #4

Solomon married Eva Mary Schwartz sometime before 1810, and had children at almost perfect 2 year increments from 1810 to 1826, having a total of 8 children.  Edmund, the ancestor of interest for us, being the oldest.

Two of Solomon’s children, Elizabeth and Charles, married into the same Dieffenbach family, both marrying children of Henry and Susan Dieffenbach.  Elizabeth married David  and  Charles married David’s sister, Susanna.

All 8 of these children lived to a “good old age”, with Mary being the only member to die in her 50’s, at age 54.  Elizabeth lived to be 93.  

Solomon was a farmer.  In 1820, 1830, and 1840 he is listed in the Tubot Twp, Northumberland county census.  (Delaware Twp did not yet exist).  In 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 he is listed in Delaware Twp, Northumberland County Pa.  Rebecca continued to live with him and Susan clear into 1880, when she was aged 53.  

Edmund, the oldest of Solomon’s children, is our “ancestor of interest”.  On 18 Apr 1834, Edmund acquired the Truckenmiller Homestead, at the corner of what is now Conrath and Truckenmiller Rds, from the heirs of John Baird.  

Floyd’s genealogy of Northumberland County has this to say about Edmund, on page 405:

“Edmund Truckenmiller, born in Delaware township, as a farmer there
for many years, at the time of his death owning two farms, one of 145
acres and one of 120 acres.  He was enterprising and intelligent in his
agricultural work, and was not only admired for his ability but esteemed
for the many sterling traits which made his influence strong in the
community.  He was a Lutheran, active in church work, and helped to
build the Union church at McEwensville, donating liberally toward the
expenses of its construction. He served as deacon and elder.  Mr.
Truckenmiller was a resident of McEwensville the last thirty years of
his life, dying May 16, 1889, aged seventy-eight years, eleven months,
twenty-five days.  Few citizens of his locality were more generally
missed, and he was held in the greatest respect by all who knew him.
Politically he was a Republican.  His wife, Mary (Schmeck), whose family
came from Berks county, died Oct. 17, 1876, aged sixty-nine years, two
months, eighteen days. Eleven children were born to this couple, of whom
Eliza died unmarried; Edmund died young; Solomon; Malinda married
Ephraim Leinbach; Daniel lives retired at Watsontown; Rachel died
unmarried; Dr. William is at Allenwood, Union Co., Pa.; Calvin is a
resident of Centerville, Mich.; Valentine S. lives in Delaware township.”





Generation #5

In 1840 the census lists Edmund as head of household with 1 male under 5 (Daniel) 1 male 15-20 (a servant?) 1 male 30-40 (Edmund himself).  1 female 5-10 (Must be Mary Malinda?  I also show Eliza as alive, and born in 1834) one female 15-20 (as Edmund would have been 15 or under when a 15 year old was born, I think it unlikely that either the male or female of this age were his children – again, this is likely a servant) and 1 female age 30-40, which would be Edmund’s wife Mary.  With the birth dates I have listed, Mary is 3 years older than Edmund.

In 1850 Edmund appears as Edward in the Delware Twp, Northumberland County Census.  Edward 45, Mary 43, Mary M. 17, Daniel 12, Valentine 7, William 5, Rachel 5 months, and Andrew Young, 17, labourer.   

In 1860 Edmund is listed as Ed, still in Delware Twp, Northumberland County Pa.  Ed is 50, Mary is also 50.  Note that by my birth date calculations she is 3 years older than him, but in the 1850 census she claims to be 2 years younger, and here in 1860 they are the same age.  The children are listed as Mary M age 26, Daniel age 21, Valentine age 17, William age 15, Rachel age 10, Calvin age 8 and Sarah Burchett age 17 – we can assume she is a domestic.

Mary and Edmund are both buried in Union Cemetery, outside the town of Mcewensville.  Mary’s stone reads “Mary, wife of Edward Truckenmiller, died October 17th 1876.   [age is buried in dirt, check!]

So we have information for 6 children in the census reports – Mary Malinda, Daniel, Valentine, William, Rachel, and Calvin.  Additionally, Gary’s records show Charles S., Edmund, Eliza, Henry S. died 1838, and Solomon, all having died young.  Rachel C, who died shortly before her 17th birthday, is buried next to Edmund and Mary, but there are not stones for Eliza, Charles, Edmund, Henry, or Solomon.  [DOUBLE CHECK!!!!]  Eliza, Edmund, and Solomon are all mentioned in Floyd’s history of Northumberland county, but this is not  a volume known for it’s complete accuracy with family lines.

The children we do know something about are Daniel, of whom our line is descended; Valentine, who took over the mill from his father, as well as served in the civil war; William U. who became a dr and  owned a large farm In Allenwood Pa; Mary Malinda who married; Rachel C, died young and is buried beside her parents; Calvin married and with children.

Calvin married Sarah Addie Schaffer in December of 1874.  They had 3 children, Albert, John, and Roy.

William U. Truckenmiller married Martha Bryson, daughter of William Bryson Esq.  They married in 1873 and had two children.  He is mentioned in the history of Lycoming County – “He came to Lycoming county in the last decade of the last century. He settled. about a mile and a half west of Allenwood, in the portion of Lycoming county now included in Union. Their land is now owned by Dr. Truckenmiller.”.  He is mentioned again in a biographical sketch of old Lycoming County, where n the sketch on Benjamin Yost it states:
"He read medicine with Dr. W. N. Truckenmiller of Gregg township".  

Valentine purchased the mill from his father Edmund, and is written about in an article in the 100th anniversary edition of the Star.  The article, in its entirety, is included in the history of the Truckenmiller Mill in this book.  Valentine served in the civil war, his discharge papers are included under Military History.  Valentine had two children, Frank and William.  Frank’s wife  Laura appeared regularly in the society pages of the Williamsport Gazette.  Also , in the same newspaper, is an article on the death of Valentine’s housekeeper’s 15 year old daughter, who accidentally shot herself with Frank’s gun while cleaning.  Frank kept a gun beside his bed, and when she moved the bed, the gun discharged.  The shooting was ruled accidental.
Floyd’s History of Northumberland County has this to say about Valentine:

“Valentine S. Truckenmiller received his early education in the common schools of his native township, later attending McEwensville Academy and a commercial college at Elmira, N. Y., from which he was graduated in 1863. Until 1874 Mr. Truckenmiller followed the business of cattle broker, being thus engaged in Chicago and other western places, and in that year he purchased the old Truckenmiller mill and homestead site in Delaware township, near Watsontown, where he has since been established. There are thirty-six acres of land attached to the mill property. When he purchased the mill he remodeled it throughout, installing the most modern machinery and bringing the capacity up to one hundred barrels daily, and he commands the principal trade in his line in the upper part of Northumberland county, producing high-grade flour, which he ships all over eastern and central Pennsylvania, the demand being particularly large in the coal regions. The popular brands are Satin, Boss and Queen, and five men are kept constantly employed. The mill is now conducted by the firm of V. S. Truckenmiller & Son, Mr. Truckenmiller's son Frank E. being in partnership with him. They also deal in grain and mill feed of all kinds. Mr. Truckenmiller has become interested in other business matters in his section, and was one of the organizers of the Farmers National Bank of Watsontown, of which he has been a director ever since. He has been active in various projects affecting the general welfare and is a leading citizen of his section. He is a member of the Presbyterian church at Watsontown, and socially belongs to Warrior Run Lodge, No. 401, F. & A.M., of Watsontown, and to Warrior Run Chapter, R.A.M. Politically he is a Republican, and during the Civil war he was in the Union service, enlisting from Watsontown in 1861 in Company B, 131st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with which he served nine months.
In 1870 Mr. Truckenmiller married Sarah E. Montgomery, daughter of William and Mary (Caldwell) Montgomery, of McEwensville, and to them were born two children, Frank E. and William S. Mrs. Truckenmiller died Nov. 7, 1890, aged forty-eight years, and is buried at Watsontown.

Frank E. Truckenmiller, son of Valentine S. Truckenmiller, is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, and conducted a drug store at Williamsport, Pa., for five years. He sold out on account of his health, and since 1902 has been associated with his father, being the junior member of the firm of V. S. Truckenmiller & Son. He is a thirty-second degree Mason. “



Mary Malinda married Ephraim Lenibach.  It’s interesting to note that the John Leinbach family, although not certainly related to  Ephraim, are listed directly above Edmund Truckenmiller’s family in the 1860 census.  

Daniel is the “ancestor of interest” here, as he was the father of Edward, and the grandfather of Ward Welsh and Charles Frederick.
In 1860, Daniel was 21 and living at the home of his parents Edmund and Mary, in the Truckenmiller Homestead.   We can assume that he was farming with his father.  He did not go to war when Lincoln was calling for volunteers, and did not serve in the Civil War until June of 1863, when he joined an emergency Militia and was enlisted for just over a month, from June 18th to July 27th, over the battle of Gettysburg.  He was part of the 28th regiment, Company I, Emergency Militia.  
“28th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry Militia (Emergency, 1863) Organized at Harrisburg June 24, 1863, for the protection of Pennsylvania against Lee's invasion. Duty in the Dept. of the Susquehanna. Destruction of railroad bridge at Wrightsville June 28. Moved to Carlisle, Pa., thence over South Mountain to Boonsboro, Md. Skirmish near Hagerstown July 11. Mustered out July 28, 1863.”  From the National Parks Soldiers and Sailors System

Daniel would have been 24, and would have been enlisting as this event occurred, and although we do not know for sure, it is likely that he saw this group of men, and perhaps applauded them as they marched.

The Harrisburg correspondent of the Philadelphia Press, of the 24th, gives the following graphic and touching account of the appearance of this company:
“ I was about to commence this letter, when I heard the sound of a drum and fife. Looking out of the window, I saw a small company of men marching up the street, and bearing three colors; one, a small, worn, and tattered silk flag, and the others new and fresh. As they approached nearer, I discovered that they were very old men, and my curiosity being excited, I ran out and followed them to the Capitol, whither they were marching. And here is what I learned: They were seventeen in all, members of the Soldiers’ Association of 1812, of Harrisburg. The oldest was seventy-six, and the youngest sixty-eight. Every man had served in the war of 1812, and had belonged to a regiment commanded by General Foster, who had lately died, and who is remembered with respect and affection as one of the best citizens of this country. They were reviewed by General Scott, at Baltimore, after he was wounded. He rode up and down the ranks with his arm in a sling. The tattered flag was borne by a Pennsylvania regiment, at the battle of Trenton, in 1777, and has been cherished in Harrisburg ever since that time. These veterans marched up to the Governor’s room, and tendered their services for the emergency. They wished to be put behind entrenchment’s, but if any other and harder service was required of them, they would cheerfully attempt it. In a few appropriate words, they addressed the Governor, and he accepted them. The only favor they asked, was to be armed with the old flint-lock muskets, such as they used to carry when they were young. It was a grand and inspiring sight! those old men, scarcely hoping to live through the war, their locks white with the frosts of many winters, their frames bowed by age, and long toil in the journey of life, marched as briskly and as accurately to the drum and fife, as any of their grand-sons could. They seemed almost carried back to the olden time, so inspiriting was the occasion. When they came out of the Governor’s room, they marched, according to the old fashion, in single file. They were halted on the green. It was curious to modern ears to hear the orders of the Captain - so different from our tactics. It was: ‘by sections of two, march;’ instead of ‘file right,’ or ‘left,’ it was ‘right,’ or ‘left wheel;’ instead of the sharp, short peremptory ‘front,’ it was ‘left face.’ So they marched down in the town, carrying the old tactics of the revolution with them. They kept their places, and kept step and obeyed orders with a precision that showed that the drill they had gone through in those stirring times, had gone not merely to the ear, but to the heart. Wherever they passed a squad of soldiers, they were loudly cheered - ‘three cheers for the veterans of 1812!’ and such lusty shouts as split the heavens, you never heard. They were observed by every one, and some would ask who they were. The bowed forms, the gray heads, and the small, torn and decayed ensign, told the whole story. I hope I shall not trespass on your space, by giving their names. They ought to be written in letters of gold. They ought to be posted at every corner of Harrisburg. They are as follows: Charles Carson, Captain; Andrew Krause, Lieutenant - ( were in the battle of Lundy’s Lane, and all through Scott’s campaign ) - James R. Boyd, William Bostick, Geo. Heiney, John Heisley, David Harris, ( secretary of the association, ). Samuel Holman, Allen Sturgeon, David J. Krause, W. P. Brady, George M’Knight, Leonard G. Cunkle, George Prince, John Shannon, George J. Heisley, Jacob Kuhn. These old heroes will go into the rifle-pits, and fight as of yore, for liberty and the Union. What they say, they mean; and their earnestness is proven by their asking for old flint-lock muskets, such as they were used to. Let the young men beware, or their grandsires will set them an example they will blush not to have forestalled.”


We are unsure when exactly Daniel and Mary Elizabeth Berger married, but their first daughter, Mary Emma was born in 1865, with Ida following in 1868, Edward in 1870, and Minnie in 1875.  In 1870 and 1880 this family appears in the Delaware twp census, and we know that they lived in the Truckenmiller Homestead.  The 1900 the census shows him living in the Watsontown Borough, and since his son Edward married in 1899 and lived in the homestead, we can assume he moved into town and left Edward take over the homestead.

Generation #6

Edward B. Truckenmiller, son of Daniel, was a charter member of the Watsontown Assembly of Artisians, and a President of the Watsontown Lutheran Church council.  He was a school teacher, a butcher, and a farmer.  He married Hattie Welsh, the daughter of Eli William Welsh.  

Edward had three sisters.  Minnie died at age 5.  Ida and (Mary) Emma married, and were both wealthy women.  Ida married Fred Benson.  Emma married Charles Metzger, an architect.  Charles was the architect for many buildings in Philadelphia, including                               and also for the Muncy Women’s prison, located not far from the farm Emma grew up on.  In addition, he designed the Truckenmiller Monument in Watsontown Cemetery.

Although Emma was very wealthy, living in a “mansion” in Philadelphia, she lived like a pauper.  (insert Betty’s story here)

It was these three, Ida, Emma, and Edward, that bought the cemetery plot, and paid for this memorial stone.  Records show that the Metzgar family and the Benson family both paid $1600.00 towards the stone, with Edward contributing $155.00  Ed also paid an additional $75 to the cemetery association for perpetual care of Lot 10, of which he was the owner.

Emma’s will left 1/3 of her estate to her sister Ida, 1/3 to her sister in law Pauline, and the remaining 1/3 was split between her brother Edward’s sons, Ward & Fred.  Both Ward and Fred received over $10,000, in addition to jewelry they chose for their wives.  Fred chose one ring with three diamonds in a gold setting.  Ward chose a ring, a “single stone in a gold mounting”, and “1 brooch, 17 small diamonds in a gold snowflake mounting” valued at $225.00. This is the brooch that Thelma lent to all of  her daughters, daughter in laws, and grandchildren to wear in their weddings.  

Edward and Hattie had three children.  Margaret, their only daughter, died at birth.  Charles Frederick and Ward Welsh were born 4 years apart, in 1904 and 1908, becoming the seventh generation of Truckenmiller’s from Sebastian’s line, in America.





Generation 7




Ward Truckenmiller grew up in the homestead, just down the road from The Brown's, who were tenant farmers in what we now call Gary's farm.  Ward married Thelma Brown in February of 1926, and Betty was born in June.  Ward and Thelma had 8 children.  Ward was a farmer, first farming with his father Ed, then farming on his own.  

Ward’s brother Fred went to college at Penn State, and farmed as well.  Fred married Catharine Cromley in 1927, the year after Ward was married.  

Fred and Ward owned the homes at both the top and bottom of what is now Truckenmiller Rd.  Ward and Thelma bought the brick house at the top of the hill, and Fred and Kate moved into the family homestead.





General Truckenmiller Notes:

Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church numbered among its early membership
the families of Truckenmiller, Wertman, Ritter, Robenold, Ruch, Hartranft,
Shade, Martz, Smith, Angst, Schuck, Raup, Myer, Fox, Menges, and others,
and worshipped in the union church for many years. At a congregational
meeting held on the 18th of August, 1854, it was decided, without a
dissenting vote, to erect a new Lutheran church, the construction of which
was accordingly begun. George P. Kamp, Jacob Hunsicker, and Samuel Menges,
Sr., composed the building committee. The completed edifice was dedicated
on the 26th of March, 1857, and the first communion therein was held on
the 27th of May following. Rev. C. Stoever was pastor in 1845; S. R.
Boyer, from April 1, 1846, to 1859; Jacob Albert, 1859-67; J. F. Wampole,
October 6, 1867, to 1876, and A. P. Pflueger, the present incumbent, since
1876. This church is connected with the General Council.

http://www.webroots.org/library/usahist/honcpa18.html


Truckenmiller's in Floyd's History Of North'd County

VALENTINE S. TRUCKENMILLER, merchant miller of Delaware township,
Northumberland county, is a native of the district in which he lives,
born Aug. 23, 1843. His ancestors have lived there for several
generations, and we give the family record from the time it was founded
in this country.  The family has become numerous in eastern and central
Pennsylvania, and the name is often found corrupted into Druckenmiller,
the Berks county branch spelling it so. The ancestor of the
Northumberland family, Sebastian Truckenmiller, spelled it with a "T,"
however, and that seems to be the correct form.
Sebastian Truckenmiller came to America on the pink "John and
William," of Sunderland, Constable Tymperton, master, from Rotterdam,
which qualified at Philadelphia Oct. 17, 1732. On the original list of
passengers (Pennsylvania Archives, Vol. XVII, Second Series, pages 72-
73)

END OF PAGE 403

his name is given as Sebastian and Bastian, and his wife's name as
Catarina. In a secluded spot, in a field on the farm of the late Jacob
Nuss, at Koch's schoolhouse, in Upper Milford township, Lehigh Co., Pa.,
lie the remains of this pioneer and Revolutionary war soldier and his
wife. He is called "Captain" Truckenmiller. For the benefit of their
many descendants a verbatim copy of the inscriptions on their tombstones
is herewith given:

Hier ruhet
Sebastian Truckenmiller
Geboren den 1 Aug. 1715,
Gestorben den 1st Feb.
1795 Alt. 79 Jahr, 6 m.
Leichten Text Elmaz 26, 19-20.

Hier ruhet
Catharina Truckenmiller,
ein geborene Schmuck-
brucken geboren den 1st Jenner,
1719 gestorben d. 30 Sept.
1793. Alt 74 jabr 9 m.
7 da. Lied Las die
todten auferstehen den
letzen tage.
Text 2 Tim. 4-7 and 8.

Among the many children of the pioneer were John, Jacob, Christian,
George, Charles and Frederick; there were also daughters.
The Federal census of 1790 mentions a number of Truckenmillers.
Christian Trickymillar had died by that time, but his family, consisting
of his widow and six daughters and three sons who were under sixteen
years old, were residents of Northumberland county.
George Truckenmiller, according to the Federal census of 1790, was
a resident of Hereford township, Berks county, his family consisting of
himself and wife, one son, and one daughter.
Charles Truckenmiller, according to the same authority, was a
resident of Hereford township; family consisted of father and mother,
three sons over sixteen years of age, four daughters, and one slave.
John Truckenmiller (Jno. Junior) was head of a family of Rockland
township, Berks county, consisting of himself and wife, one son above
sixteen, and two under sixteen, and three daughters.
(There are sons bearing these three names, George, Charles and
John, in Sebastian Truckenmiller's family, but according to one account
these three are said to be the sons of Johan Michael Truckenmiller, who
emigrated in 1742, coming in the ship "Francis and Elizabeth.")
In 1790 Sebastian Truckenmiller, the emigrant, lived in Upper
Milford, Northampton (now Lehigh) Co., Pa., had wife, but no children
left at home.
Jacob Truckenmiller the same year lived in that place and had
family consisting of himself and wife, two sons over sixteen, one son
under sixteen, and two daughters.
There also lived in 1790 in Upper Milford a George Trockenmiller,
family consisting of himself and wife, one son and two daughters.
John Truckenmiller died in the latter part of January, 1799, in
Northumberland county, Pa., an account of his estate being filed Feb. 2,
1799. Michael Meiser was named the administrator.
In 1802, among the list of taxables in Mahantango township,
Schuylkill Co., Pa., appeared the names of Valentine and Michael
Truckenmiller.
Frederick Truckenmiller moved from Berks county to Penn township,
Northumberland (now Snyder) county, at an early period. He died shortly
before March 29, 1796, and his last will and testament, on record in
Will Book 1, page 86, provides as follows for his "dearly beloved wife"
Christina: Ten acres of land on north side of Middle Creek, one hundred
pounds of lawful money, choice of one cow, six sheep. The executors were
wife Christina, George Motz and Adam Bohlander. The children of
Frederick and Christina Truckenmiller were: John Frederick, Peter, Mary,
Elizabeth, Margaret, Christina, Catarina, Maghtalena and Barbarah.
Jacob Truckenmiller, evidently son of Sebastian, was born Aug. 29,
1759, in lower Berks county, and came to Northumberland county before
the Revolution, settling in Delaware township, where his descendants
still live. He was the pioneer of the family in this immediate locality,
and being a millwright and miller by calling built the original
Truckenmiller mill, selecting the site now owned by his great-grandson,
Valentine S. Truckenmiller. He died Aug. 23, 1823, at McEwensville and
is buried there, in the old upper cemetery. In religion he was a
Lutheran. His account, entered Sept. 9, 1823, in Will Book 2, page 442,
mentions sons Jacob, Solomon, George, Samuel, and also Mrs. Mary
Truckenmiller, probably his wife. The executors were Solomon
Truckenmiller and Henry Reader. The account was filed in the Register's
office.  As shown by tombstone records, Jacob's wife was named
Annamaria, and she was born Jan. 16, 1763, and died July 27, 1843. Their
children were: Solomon, mentioned below; Jacob, born March 22, 1790,
who died April 15, 1880 (his wife, Sarah, died Oct. 3, 1873, aged
seventy-six years, one month, fifteen days); George; and Samuel, born in
1803, who died in 1883 (his wife, Sarah, born in 1805, died in 1895).
Solomon Truckenmiller, son of Jacob, was born June 11, 1785, and
lived in Delaware township, Northumberland county, near  McEwensville,
where he had a farm of 120 acres, this property remaining in the family
name until 1903. He died on that place Nov. 7, 1857.  Mr. Truckenmiller
was a Lutheran in religious faith, a member of the church at
McEwensville, which he served in official capacities for many years. He
was a tall man, of medium build, and light complexion. His wife, Eve,
died Sept. 21, 1864, aged eighty years, seven

END OF PAGE 404

months, twenty-seven days.  Their children were as follows: Edmund,
Charles and Solomon are all mentioned below; Mary (Polly) married John
Clapp and they lived in Lewis township, Northumberland county; Susan
died Dec. 25, 1895, aged seventy-three years, six months, fifteen days,
unmarried; Rebecca died July 7, 1886, aged sixty years, three months,
eleven days, unmarried; Sarah married Jonathan Strause and lived in
Montour county; Elizabeth married David  Dieffenbacher and lived in
Delaware township.
Edmund Truckenmiller, born in Delaware township, was a farmer there
for many years, at the time of his death owning two farms, one of 145
acres and one of 120 acres.  He was enterprising and intelligent in his
agricultural work, and was not only admired for his ability but esteemed
for the many sterling traits which made his influence strong in the
community.  He was a Lutheran, active in church work, and helped to
build the Union church at McEwensville, donating liberally toward the
expenses of its construction. He served as deacon and elder.  Mr.
Truckenmiller was a resident of McEwensville the last thirty years of
his life, dying May 16, 1889, aged seventy-eight years, eleven months,
twenty-five days.  Few citizens of his locality were more generally
missed, and he was held in the greatest respect by all who knew him.
Politically he was a Republican.  His wife, Mary (Schmeck), whose family
came from Berks county, died Oct. 17, 1876, aged sixty-nine years, two
months, eighteen days. Eleven children were born to this couple, of whom
Eliza died unmarried; Edmund died young; Solomon; Malinda married
Ephraim Leinbach; Daniel lives retired at Watsontown; Rachel died
unmarried; Dr. William is at Allenwood, Union Co., Pa.; Calvin is a
resident of Centerville, Mich.; Valentine S. lives in Delaware township.
Valentine S. Truckenmiller received his early education in the
common schools of his native township, later attending McEwensville
Academy and a commercial college at Elmira, N. Y., from which he was
graduated in 1863. Until 1874 Mr. Truckenmiller followed the business of
cattle broker, being thus engaged in Chicago and other western places,
and in that year he purchased the old Truckenmiller mill and homestead
site in Delaware township, near Watsontown, where he has since been
established.  There are thirty-six acres of land attached to the mill
property.  When he purchased the mill he remodeled it throughout,
installing the most modern machinery and bringing the capacity up to one
hundred barrels daily, and he commands the principal trade in his line
in the upper part of Northumberland county, producing high-grade flour,
which he ships all over eastern and central Pennsylvania, the demand
being particularly large in the coal regions.  The popular brands are
Satin, Boss and Queen, and five men are kept constantly employed. The
mill is now conducted by the firm of V. S. Truckenmiller & Son, Mr.
Truckenmiller's son Frank E. being in partnership with him. They also
deal in grain and mill feed of all kinds.  Mr. Truckenmiller has become
interested in other business matters in his section, and was one of the
organizers of the Farmers National Bank of Watsontown, of which he has
been a director ever since.  He has been active in various projects
affecting the general welfare and is a leading citizen of his section.
He is a member of the Presbyterian church at Watsontown, and socially
belongs to Warrior Run Lodge, No. 401, F. & A.M., of Watsontown, and to
Warrior Run Chapter, R.A.M. Politically he is a Republican, and during
the Civil war he was in the Union service, enlisting from Watsontown in
1861 in Company B, 131st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with
which he served nine months.
In 1870 Mr. Truckenmiller married Sarah E. Montgomery, daughter of
William and Mary (Caldwell) Montgomery, of McEwensville, and to them
were born two children, Frank E. and William S.  Mrs. Truckenmiller died
Nov. 7, 1890, aged forty-eight years, and is buried at Watsontown.
Frank E. Truckenmiller, son of Valentine S. Truckenmiller, is a
graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, and conducted a drug
store at Williamsport, Pa., for five years. He sold out on account of
his health, and since 1902 has been associated with his father, being
the junior member of the firm of V. S. Truckenmiller & Son.  He is a
thirty-second degree Mason.
Charles Truckenmiller, son of Solomon, was born Sept. 20, 1813, and
lived in Delaware township, where he followed farming.  He had an
eighty-acre property near McEwensville.  His wife, Susanna
(Dieffenbacher), born Sept. 20, 1820, died May 2, 1892. Mr.
Truckenmiller died Feb. 13, 1893.  They had children  as follows:
Augustus, of Catawissa, Pa., a musician; George, who lives in Dakota;
Henry, of Dakota; Elizabeth, married and living in Scranton, Pa.; and
Ella, married and living in Dakota. The three who settled in the west
have all done well and all the members of the family are in prosperous
circumstances.
Solomon Truckenmiller, son of Solomon, lived near McEwensville in
Delaware township, where he had a small farm and followed agricultural
pursuits. He married Eliza Strab, and they had two children:  Peter, who
died at Milton, Pa.; and Isaac, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Mr.
Truckenmiller died Oct 9, 1896, aged seventy-six years, six months,
nineteen days; his wife died Jan. 15, 1892, aged sixty years, eight
months, seven days.
Jacob E. Truckenmiller (son of Jacob) of Com-

END OF PAGE 405

pany B, 131st Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, died in hospital at
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 15, 1882, aged thirty-five years, nine months,
twenty-two days.
As previously mentioned, some branches of the family spell the name
Druckenmiller. Of these, Michael Druckenmiller, millwright, of Hereford
township, Berks county, was said to be a descendant of the Charles
Truckenmiller who in 1790 lived in Hereford township. Michael's children
were: Daniel, Enos, Clara, Hannah, Lucy and Elizabeth.
Enos Druckenmiller (as he wrote his name), son of Michael, was born
Dec. 14, 1821, and died March 29, 1899, at Zieglersville in Upper
Milford township, Lehigh Co., Pa., his death being caused by apoplexy.
He is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at that place, and was long an
active worker in the church, in all its departments; serving as elder
and Sunday school teacher. He was a member of the building committee
when the new church was erected. For many years he was director of a
singing school. Mr. Druckenmiller was a prosperous farmer and mechanic
all his life, owning several farms. He was a Democrat in politics, and
served nine years as school director of Hereford township, Berks county.
He married Elizabeth N. Desch, daughter of George and Margerite
(Marsteller) Desh, and they had a large family, namely: Benneville died
of measles and brain fever when twenty-two years old; Rev. Joel settled
about 188O in Michigan, where he serves a charge at Rogers City;
Tilghman married Barbara Frey; Elizabeth married Milton Kleinsmith;
Henry, now of Atlanta, Ga., married Ellen Wagonhorst; David married
Katie Nuss and lives at Sellersville, Pa.; Benjamin D. is a resident of
Kutztown, Pa.; Emma died of diphtheria in her ninth year; Mama married
William Weiss and (second) Hiram Walker; Susanna married Benjamin Brey;
Rosa married Allen W. Sheimer; Sallie married John Sweitzer; George D.
is a Lutheran minister; Maggie married William Shubert; Laura married
Richard Reese; Annie married Allen Snyder.
Rev. George D. Druckenmiller, son of Enos, graduated from
Muhlenberg College in 1894, and then entered Mount Airy Theological
Seminary, from which he was graduated three years later. He was ordained
at Lancaster June 14, 1897, by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania and
adjacent states, and in July of the same year took charge of the
Freeburg parish, in Snyder county, to which he had been called. Three
years later he received a call to the Freemansburg charge, in
Northampton county, in May, 1900, and there he had a very successful
pastorate, during which a house of worship was erected and the
membership greatly increased. On Dec. 1, 1905, he accepted an urgent
call to Nazareth, where a $40,000 church was erected during his
incumbency and 325 new members added to the church roll. He resigned to
accept a unanimous call to Hamburg, where he took charge of St. John's
Lutheran Church Sept. 1, 1910. He has made many friends during his brief
service at that church. Mr. Druckenmiller married Ellen J. Lerch, of
Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Floyd's Northumberland County Genealogy

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