Saturday, January 26, 2013

Peter Trachsel 1691-1766


Peter Trachsel
Birth:  Nov. 6, 1691, Switzerland
Death:  Apr. 6, 1766 Frederick County Maryland, USA 
married 1721 in Wolfersheim, Biles, Germany
Juliana Catharina Trauthager
Born 1703 France
Died

Timeline

1691- Birth
Lenk, Bern, Switzerland 

1691 6 Nov -Baptism
PeterTroxell was the son of Jakob Trachsel and Margaretha (Brengel) Trachsel. Born at Lenk in Semmental, Switzerland in the Canton of Bern, where he was baptized on November 6, 1691.


1719 - Residence
Age: 28
Pfalz Palatine area of Germany 
Peter was taken by his parents to the Pfalz Palatine area of Germany (in the Homburg-Saar area in Germany near the French border) in early 1719. Here they settled near the hamlet of Wolfersheim.

1721 Marriage to Juliana Catharina Trauthager
Age: 30

1733 - Arrival
Age: 42
Pennsylvania 

1733 - Residence
Age: 42
Whitehall Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania 
Upon landing at Philadelphia, PA, on August 17, 1733 (four years earlier than his brother John), Peter and his family proceeded to Egypt in upper Lehigh Co., in the township of Whitehall. Little is known of Peter and his family during their stay here.

1734 23 Sep - Religion
Age: 43
Egypt Reformed Church, 4122 S Church st, Egypt, Lehigh County, PA 
Son David was baptized in the Egypt Reformed Church

1737 15 Oct - Property
Age: 46
Peter was apparently a man of some means, owning during his lifetime in Egypt and Lehigh Co. between 800 to 1600 acres of land there. During his stay in Egypt he secured, on October 15, 1737, his first warrant for 300 acres of land.

1741 9 Mar - Religion
Age: 50
Egypt Reformed Church, 4122 S Church st, Egypt, Lehigh County, PA 
He and his son, Peter Jr., took the sacrament before naturalization there on March 9, 1741

1742 24 Apr - Naturalization
Age: 51
April 10, 1742 took the Naturalization Oath in the Supreme Court at Philadelphia. On April 24, 1742 they were certified as citizens (of Great Britain).

1743 16 Apr - Property
Age: 52
On April 16 1743, Peter made application for a Warrant at the land office at Philadelphia to acquire a tract of land located in the Lower Jordan Valley, on the Jordan River
Photos (1)Stories (1)

1754 12 Jan - Residence
Age: 63
The last known date of Peter Sr. living in the house was January 12th 1754, the day that he mortgaged the house and property to Lynford Lardner for L294. Records indicated that soon after this date Peter moved to Fredricks County, MD

1755 - Religion
Age: 64
After removing from Egypt he became a member of the Jordan Reformed congregation


1766 16 Apr   - Death
Age: 75
Frederick, Maryland, United States 


RESEARCH:

PeterTroxell was the son of Jakob Trachsel and Margaretha (Brengel) Trachsel.  Born at Lenk in Semmental, Switzerland in the Canton of Bern, where he was baptized on November 6, 1691. 


 Peter was taken by his parents to the Pfalz Palatine area of Germany (in the Homburg-Saar area in Germany near the French border) in early 1719. Here they settled near the hamlet of Wolfersheim.

 According to the first church record book of Rieschweiler, Germany, "Peter Trachsel, son of Jacob Trachsel from Lenk , Canton of Bern Switzerland,  received Confirmatory Blessings on April 8, 1708".

Johannes Peter married Juliana Catharina (Trauthager) Fraudhueger. They were married abt 1721 in Wolfersheim, Biles, Germany.  She was born in 1703 Katzenthal, Alsace, France, and died Apr. 16, 1795 Lehigh County Pennsylvania, USA.

Notes from Jim Troxell:
In looking over the various notes from various sources about the crossing to the New World by Peter Trachsel and his wife, Juliana Catharina Trauthager, I have concluded the following:
Prior to their cross the Atlantic on the Ship “Samuel” in 1733, Juliana had given birth to five children.  One, a daughter, died in childbirth.  Two other’s death date is listed as 1733, which makes me wonder if they died en route to America.  At any rate, only two of then born sons arrived with their parents to Philadelphia.  They were Johann Jacob and John Peter, Jr.  We (James P. Troxel, b 1946, and brother, nephews, nieces and son) are descendants of the next child that was born and the first to be born in America: David Troxel, born 1734.  In all, Peter and Juliana gave birth to five more children upon their arrival to Pennsylvania.  That means they had 10 children altogether.  

Copied from the Lehigh County, PA History by Roberts, Compiled by Jack D. Salmon of Royal Oak, Michigan:
Emigrated to America on ship "Samuel" of London in 1733 under the command of Hugh Persy, Master from Rotterdam, late of Deal. They were included in the passenger list of "Palatines, 89 males above 16, 86 females, 54 males under 16, 62 females under 16 --- in all, 291". Among those on the ship's manifest appeared the names "Peter Drachsel, above 16, Peter and Daniel Drachsel, under 16". 

Peter Traxel (Troxell), emigrated from Switzerlandand emigrated to Philadelphia in the ship "Samuel" with his wife Juliana Catharina and two sons, Peter, aged 9, and Daniel, aged 7, August 17, 1733

Upon landing at Philadelphia, PA, on August 17, 1733 (four years earlier than his brother John), Peter and his family proceeded to Egypt in upper Lehigh Co., in the township of Whitehall. Little is known of Peter and his family during their stay here. 

He settled at Egypt, Whitehall Township where his son David was baptized on September 23, 1734. The Egypt Reformed Church, was founded in 1734,

In 1736 when his son John was baptized, he isreferred to as church censor of the congregation. In 1737, he was deacon and his name appears in the Egypt Reformed Church records until 1744

 Peter and Juliana had a number of children of which eight are recorded. Except for Peter Jr. and Daniel, who emigrated with their parents, all the children were born and baptized in Egypt, PA.  Peter Sr.'s name appears in the church records at Egypt until 1744.

Peter was apparently a man of some means, owning during his lifetime in Egypt and Lehigh Co. between 800 to 1600 acres of land there. During his stay in Egypt he secured, on October 15, 1737, his first warrant for 300 acres of land. 

He and his son, Peter Jr., took the sacrament before naturalization there on March 9, 1741 and April 10, 1742 took the Naturalization Oath in the Supreme Court at Philadelphia.

 On April 24, 1742 they were certified as citizens (of Great Britain).

On April 16 1743, Peter made application for a Warrant at the land office at Philadelphia to acquire a tract of land located in the Lower Jordan Valley, on the Jordan River, a fertile land similar to that which he had known as a boy in his native Switzerland where agriculture was the primary vocation. This parcel, 305 acres, 35 perches, was purchased November 10 1743 from Casper Wistar, the bill of sale being made in 1742. A considerable length of time transpired from the date of the Warrant in 1743 until the Patent was granted on 4/3/1782, but in those days this was not uncommon. The date and land office index number are recorded on file in the land office now located in Harrisburg, PA. The following is the description, courses and measurements of this tract as recorded under Warrant # D-13-199, Patent #P-1-179: "Begin at a post thence N 10 E 181 perches; N 80 W 286 perches; S 10 W 181 perches; S 80 E 286 perches; to the place of beginning. Called Troxelburg." Lower Jordon Valley, Pennsylvania German Settlement, published by the Lehigh County Historical Society, Volume 18, 1950, pg. 32.

The story goes that the Indians would burn the lands south of the Jordon Creek, chasing the wild game across and through the gap in the mountains, where the Indians would wait in ambush to make their kill for their meat supply. When the settlers came to this valley they gave the creek the name of Jordon as it flowed through a country, the south of which was like the desert of Petrea and the north was the fruitful country of Palestine.


The home site of Peter and his family was approximately 5 miles from their old home at Egypt. On a location one-quarter mile downstream from the stone bridge at "Troxell's Crossing" and to the south of and within a few hundred feet of the Jordon River, on gently sloping ground and near the edge of the Jordan flood basin, stands a remarkable memorial to Peter Troxell. Here in 1744, he and his sons built a substantial dwelling, 35x25 feet, 2 1/2 stories high, with an adjoining kitchen 20x23-1/2 feet in size. The walls were constructed 20 inches thick. The house was built primarily for the use of Peter's family, but proved in time to be a haven for many purposes. During the French and Indian Wars the settlers more than once took refuge therein to escape the marauding Indians. Meetings of the Reformed congregation was held there, and at one time it served as a tavern by Peter Jr. in 1761. It is related that while the construction of the house was going on, Indians sat on the hillside opposite the river and watched the proceedings, Peter and his sons never knowing whether they would attack.Upon visiting the location described above, one can still see this fine old house, still standing in its original form. It is believed to be the oldest house in Lehigh County.

From another source: On November 10, 1743, he purchased from Caspar Wistar two tracts of one hundred acres each along the Jordan River, for which a bill of sale had been made in 1742. Here he built a stone house,30 by 21 feet, in the year 1744 which is still standing, and is the oldest house in Lehigh County. When the large hearth was removed several years ago, the mantelpiece was found to contain the figures 1744. In this old building now owned by the Minnich family, travelers were entertained in the early days. The house stands near the Jordan Creek, east of Troxell's crossing, on the electric road from Allentown to Slatington. Peter Troxell mortgaged these tracts on January 12, 1754 to Lynford Lardner for 294 Lira. The house is mentioned in the mortgage and the land is described as "situated on a branch of the Lehi creek, called Indian creek". 

 The Troxell's lived in the home until April 8th 1784 at which time it was secured by the Minnich family. They resided there as owners until about 1950, at which time the house and property it is situated upon, plus adjoining tracts, were purchased by the Trojan Powder Company of Allentown. The Minniches made repairs to the house as they were needed during their reign as owners and the Trojan Powder Co., along with interested individuals, continued the maintenance until today it stands in as good condition as it was the day it was built. Present plans are for the house to be maintained as a historical site and monument to our fore-bearer  The validity of the date of construction is borne out by the fact that when the large hearth was removed in the kitchen for repairs in 1910, the mantel piece was found to be inscribed with the figures "1744".

The last known date of Peter Sr. living in the house was  January 12th 1754, the day that he mortgaged the house and property to Lynford Lardner for L294. Records indicated that soon after this date Peter moved to Fredricks County, MD where he died in April, 1766 at the age of 75 years. His oldest son, Peter (2) assumed the mortgage on the old home and lived there for a number of years.Located between the two houses is Troxell Crossing. The large brick elementary school bears the name of Troxell.  

After removing from Egypt he became a member of the Jordan Reformed congregation.

Naturalization on April 10, 1742

He secured additional land, in all over 500 acres. Peter Troxell deeded to his sons five tracts of land. These five tracts adjoin each other and upon them are still standing five stone houses built by members of the Troxell family

Little is known at this time of the disposition of the real estate that Peter held in and around Egypt, however evidence is present that some of his heirs held title to portions of these lands, and in one case it is believed that his brother, Hans John, who emigrated to America in 1737, secured some of this property
,
Julianna & Peter are buried in Jordan United Church of Christ Cemetery, Allentown, Lehigh County Pennsylvania, USA 

About the Voyage:
ENSMINGERS OF ALSACE (1520–1733) 
[I have omitted several paragraphs concerning theories about early Ensmingers as irrelevant to the Samuel crew.] 
In the late spring or early summer of 1733, a group of families from the Mattstall region prepared for a trip overland (about 30 km) to the Rhine.  Their journey took them downstream to Rotterdam and the Atlantic, and to a ship bound for Pennsylvania.  John Wolfersberger, brother-in-law of Peter Ensminger, had traveled to America in 1730.  Church records at Mattstall record the baptism of friend Henry Haller’s daughter, with sponsors Peter Frey, Catharine Ensminger (wife of Peter), and Ursula Knobel.  None of these family members appear in church records after April 15, 1733.  These same four families—Ensminger, Frey, Haller, and Knobel—were on the ship “Samuel” when it landed at Philadelphia on August 17, 1733.  Peter Ensminger’s mother-in-law Catharine Trautmann was also with them.   
The mass migration of German-speaking folk to Pennsylvania began in the early 1700s and continued until the time of the American Revolution (1775).  They were mostly Lutheran and Reformed.  Most came from the Palantinate, however the Ensmingers came from Alsace, just south of the Palantinate.  These persons settled in southeastern Pennsylvania and maintained themselves as a distinctive people.  As farmers, they excelled.  They were conservative, industrious, religious, and frugal.  The German language prevailed for many years—today Pennsylvania Dutch—a written and spoken language.  From 1727 to 1775, 324 ships arrived, with an average of 200 persons per ship or 64,800.  In 1775 the population of Pennsylvania was about 300,000, one-third of German origin.  Peter’s ship, the Samuel #29, landed on August 17, 1733.   
An account of the voyage follows: “The eleven families (62 individuals) from the Mattstall area, including Peter Ensminger and family, had about twenty miles to go to reach the Rhine river.  Here they got on a boat going to Rotterdam, Holland—about 350 miles.  They left Mattstall about the end of April.  Rotterdam would be reached by the middle of May. 
“Stops at German customs houses slowed them down. Strange sights and new scenes caused comment.  Koblenz and Koln seemed large.  Stops were made to buy food and other supplies.  Then windmills and canals appeared.  They were in Holland.  Signs and speech were in Dutch.  They got off the boat and looked at the quaint, gabled houses, the market, and the churches. 
“The first task was to locate the ship SAMUEL and its master. Hugh Percy.  They checked in and stored their luggage in the hold.  They bought butter, cheese, and smoked fish.  The 291 passengers set sail for Deal, England, near Dover.  Here they took on more provisions and crewmembers. 
“The ship was about 140 x 30 x 15.  Sleeping quarters were below deck—for families, for single men, for single women.  Each person had a space about 6 x 2 feet, with 5 feet for headroom.  There was little privacy.  The crewmembers had their own quarters.  There was a cabin for the captain.  He had promised to supply water, flour, some dried meat and peas, as well as cheese.  It took a lot of food to feed 291 people plus crew for three months.  On the voyage there would be births, deaths, and illnesses.  Likely Christina Ensminger and Ursula Haller were among the children who died.   
“The trip was hardest on the very young.  There was no milk or fruit or green vegetables.  It was hard for the old folks, too.  Catherine Trautmann was 62, Appolonia Frey 28, Elizabeth Carle 50.  The captain reminded them that England was on the old calendar, eleven days behind Germany.  There were all kinds of people on board. 
“Daily prayers were held, with church services on Sundays.  The men walked on deck.  The women cooked and cleaned and tried to keep the little ones from falling overboard.  The older children were a great help.  The old told stories to the young.  Soon they were out on the broad Atlantic.  The captain said the 4000-mile trip to Philadelphia would take about three months, if the winds were favorable.  The ship would go south about 1000 miles to the Canaries, then pick up trade winds to carry it across the Atlantic. 
“Wind and rainstorms made the going rough.  The families took turns cooking on the iron grates.  At night the cries of the young, the moans of the ill, the groans of the old could be heard.  When the wind roared, the boat creaked, the waves splashed.  Then one day land was sighted – America – green fields and houses. 
“Friday morning, August 17th, the ship anchored at Philadelphia.  This was the first of seven ships to arrive in 1733.  The captain turned in his list of 90 names—men over 16.  The men had to go to the courthouse and take the oath of allegiance and the oath of abjuration—denying the right of a Pretender.” 
[several more paragraphs about the Ensmingers in Lancaster County, PA.] 
*Marsha L. Ensminger 


Misc:
A grandson, JACOB TROXEL, born in 1758, enlisted in WASHINGTON’s Colonial Army at the age of 16, and after four years of military service, he hit the pioneer trail westward as a trader to the Indians in the Cumberland wilderness, reaching this area during the winter of 1779. He was known as “Big JAKE” by the Indians and traders. At the age of 21 he made love to the beautiful and vivacious Princess Cornblossom, daughter of Chief CHU’QUALITAGUE. They had a son known as Little JAKE, the notorious half-breed, who became chief of all the Cumberland River and Plateau Indians at the age of 21. According to TOM’s story, he raised hell all over the plateau regions until about 1807, when he and his tribesmen accepted amnesty and Little JAKE handed over to the law his scalping blade with nine notches on the handle.

Found on http://www.tngenweb.org/scott/fnb_v6n4_thomas_h_troxel.htm


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