Sunday, October 19, 2014

John Bender 1768-1840

John Bender
Born abt 1768
Died After 1840 in Turbett Twp, Juniata County Pa
Married
Born abt 1770
Died in Turbett Twp, Juniata County PA

Children:
Anna Nancy Bender 1795 – 1861 M.John Sulouff
William Bender abt 1797 
Barbara Bender abt 1810
Peter Bender  abt 1812
George Bender 1815 – 1880
Henry Bender 1817 – 1888
Jacob Bender 1818 – 
Catherine Bender 1820 – 
Elisabeth Bender 1822 – 


1768 - Abt.
In 1784 we know that John is "over 14" - so he was born in 1770 or earlier.

Possible? His father was Johan George, which may have been listed as Joh & transcribed as John, but his mother was Anna Elizabeth, not Anna Mary...


We also know that John had at least two sisters - 
"    Valentine Wisehaupt, the father, who died in 1822 and is buried at Church Hill, came from Hesse, Germany, and first located in Lancaster County, Pa.      He was married three times and two of his wives were sisters of John Bender. The last of these two were Margaretta Bender. She came with Valentine to Juniata County, and died at 45 in 1808. She was one of the first to be buried in the Church Hill cemetery. Valentine Sr. was an officer of the church and her grave was located on the summit near that building. It is indicated by a tall white sandstone, the inscription is in German, it includes her maiden name, "Margaretta Bender Wisehaupt," who died at 45y 1m 3d in 1808; and that she had three sons and two daughters. That marker was a loving memorial by her husband, Valentine, and he no doubt lies by her side in an unmarked grave. The inscription on her headstone being in German and no longer readable, both have long since been forgotten by the public." - from the Flickinger Family History

1784 - In The Estate of His Father George - 
1784 Estate of George Bender of Mt. Joy: George Bender Jr. over 14, guardian is John Fissel, John Bender over 14, guardian is Valentine Weisshaup, Barbara Bender is under 14, her guardian is John Fissel. The estate was worth 76.19.3 and after the real estate was sold it was worth 695.10.6.


1795 - Daughter Anna Born - 

Translation: Two sanctioned in marriage John Bender and his house-wife Elizabeth, a born Kammerer, had a daughter born into the world by the name of Anna Benderin and in the year of our Lord 1795 on the 18th day of February at 8'oclock in the evening, in the sign of the waterman. Baptized by Father Benz the 16th day of Sept 1797. Witness Peter Kammerer and his wife Katherine, born in in Mt Joy Township, Lancaster County in America in the state of Pennsylvania While my Name must be held up before men, before God only the Soul is known. He has sealed me in Baptism, a righteous father knowing his child; In his hand he inscribed me, nothing can steal me away. Printed by Johann Valentin Schuller


1800-
1800 U.S. Census Milford Twp., Mifflin Co., Pa page 476
John Pender 1m 26-45, 1f 16-26 [from Mt Joy]

1800 U.S. Census Mt Joy Lancaster Co., Pa, p. 17
George Bender 1m 16-26, 2m 0-10, 1m 16-26
John Bender 1m 45+, 2m 16-26, 2m 0-10, 1f 16-26


1801  - Moved to Turbett Twp, Juniata County, PA
"John Bender appears to be the son of John George Bender 1722 – 1782 of Mt Joy Township. He came to Juniata County with Valentine Wisehaupt who was married to Margaret bender daughter of John George bender of Mt Joy Twp., Lancaster County; Valentine Wisehaupt was married to two of John Bender’s sisters."

"Valentine Wisehaupt b. Feb. 22, 1797 in Lancaster Co., Pa, died in his 84th year, July 21, 1880. Valentine in 1801 came to Turbett Township with his father valentine Sr., and John Bender, the latter is said to be the ancestor of all the Benders in the Tuscarora Valley."

FLICKINGER FAM. HIST., p. 745, mentions a pear tree "brought by John Bender from Lancaster county about the year 1800" planted in Mifflin>Juniata Co. in 1801 at the site of a log house built by John and Sally Weimer "on the farm north of Limestone Ridge, later known as the Bossart, Briggs, and William H. Groninger farm."

"His grandfather, John Bender, born in Lancaster County, Pa., removed to Turbett Township, Juniata County, where he carried on his occupation of weaving, also cultivating some land of which he was the owner. He had been married before leaving Lancaster County and had these children: William;, George;, Peter; Henry; Jacob; Catherine; Barbara and Elizabeth. John Bender was a member of the German Reformed church. Both he and his wife died in Turbett Township. " -Biographical Encylcopedia of Huntingdon, Mifflin, Juniata and Perry Counties. P. 952, 953


1820 

1820 United States Federal Census about John Painter
Name: John Painter
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Turbett, Mifflin, Pennsylvania
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons - Males - Under 10: 4
Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 15: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 26 thru 44: 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Manufactures: 1
Free White Persons - Under 16: 7
Free White Persons - Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 10
Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 10


U.S. Census Mifflin Twp., Turbett Twp., p. 353
Valentine Wisehaupt 1m 45+, 2m 16-25, 1f 26-44, 3f 16-25, 1f 10-15
John Painter 1m 45+, 1m 16-25, 4m –10, 1f 26-44, 2f 10-15, 1f –10


Pennsylvania, Septennial Census, 1779-1863 about John Painter
Name: John Painter
Residence Year: 1821
Residence Place: Turbett, Mifflin, Pennsylvania, USA
Occupation - Weaver

1830 

1830 United States Federal Census about John Panter
Name: John Panter
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Turbett, Mifflin, Pennsylvania
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 2
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 6
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):

U.S. Census Turbett Twp., Mifflin Co., Pa, p. 391
John Panter 1m 50-59, 2m 20-29, 2m 10-14, 1f 50-59 (1771-1780)
William Panter 1m 30-39, 1m 5-9, 2m –5, 1f 30-39

1840

U.S. Census Turbett Twp., Juniata Co., Pa, p. 464
John Bainder 1m 70-79, 1m 10-14, 1f 60-69, 1f 30-39
William Bainder 1m 40-49, 2m 5-9, 1f 40-49
George Bainder 1m 30-39, 1m 20-29, 1m –5, 2f 20-29, 1f –5
Peter Bainder 1m 20-29, 1m 15-19, 1m –5, 1f 20-29

1840 U.S. Census Mifflintown, Juniata Co., Pa, p. 464
John Bender 1m 20-29, 1m 5-9, 1f 20-29, 1f –5

Research:

A 37 Marker Y-DNA match between a descendent of John McGill Bender 1858 - 1910 and the Lancaster County Bender line of John Bender Jr. 1715 - 1784 showing this family is closely related to the Bender family of Kirchardt, Baden. John McGill Bender was the son of Henry Bender 1817 - 1888 and Margaret Wilson. Henry Bender was the son of John Bender 1770-1840 and Elizabeth Kemmerer. This is supported by the biography of Christian Bender that names John Bender's children; the Suloff and the Flickinger Family History that states John Bender came from Lancaster County with his brother in law Valentin Wisehaupt who had married two of John Bender's sisters who were daughters of John George Bender 1721 - 1782 of Mount Joy Twp., Lancaster County, PA. There is also a taufschein for John Bender's eldest daughter that states she was born in Mount Joy (or Manheim) Lancaster County, so there is no doubt John Bender was the youngest son of John George Bender and wife Elizabeth of Mount Joy Twp., Lancaster County, PA.
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Valentine Weishaupt in 1801 came to Turbett Twp., with his father, Valentine Sr., and John Bender. The latter is said to be the ancestor of all the Benders in the Tuscarora Valley.
Valentine Wisehaupt, the father, who died in 1822 and is buried at Church Hill, came from Hesse, Germany, and first located in Lancaster County, Pa.

He was married three times and two of his wives were sisters of John Bender. The last of these two were Margaretta Bender. She came with Valentine to Juniata County, and died at 45 in 1808. She was one of the first to be buried in the Church Hill cemetery. Valentine Sr. was an officer of the church and her grave was located on the summit near that building. It is indicated by a tall white sandstone, the inscription is in German, it includes her maiden name, "Margaretta Bender Wisehaupt," who died at 45y 1m 3d in 1808; and that she had three sons and two daughters. That marker was a loving memorial by her husband, Valentine, and he no doubt lies by her side in an unmarked grave. The inscription on her headstone being in German and no longer readable, both have long since been forgotten by the public.
This worthy pioneer, Valentine Weishaupt, was a farmer, Lutheran and lived near the west end of Turbett Township. He was a reader of the Bible and Sabbath observer. His zeal for a house of public worship lead him to seek for his dead a beautiful buying place near it; and to erect to the memory of his wife, what in her day was a large ornamental and costly memorial.
His piety also enabled him to leave a very creditable, historic footprint, whereby he is still remembered by those who are familiar with the history of the Port Royal Lutheran Church. He is greatly remembered as being one of the two trusted friends and officials, when the site was bought for the first Lutheran Church established in the Tuscarora Valley at Church Hill, near Port Royal in the year 1801. These two men were Valentine Wisehaupt and Peter Rice, Trustees of the German Lutheran church. The congregation was named, "Lower Tuscarora," but the building often went as "Rice's Church" at Church Hill.
Nine of the family of Valentine and Margaretta Wisehaupt grew to manhood. Valentine, his son, was next to the youngest; Margaret, (Peggy), the youngest, married a Brandt, lived in Perry, but was well and favorably known in Juniata County.
The family of Valentine and Elizabeth Saylor Wisehaput consisted of one son, William.
William Lepley Wisehaput b. Mar. 3, 1840, Farmer, Lutheran, lived all his days on his father's fine farm. On Nov. 3, 1868 he married Eliza Jane Maffett, daughter of James (1805-1888) and Margaret Kokil Maffat. he died at 62, May 20, 1902, and Eliza his wife, Feb. 24, 1893.

Pages 705, 706, The Flickinger Family History, Rev. Robert E. Flickinger Success Composition & Printing Co., Des Moines, IA, 1927.

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William, son of John, has a son Christian:
Pricilla Saylor and Christian Bender

Pricilla Saylor b. Nov. 18, 1824, on Nov. 22, 1853 married Christian Bender, son of William and Barbara Brandt Bender, b. May 27, 1825, Farmer, Beekeeper and Butcher. They lived all their days upon the farm on which they located after marriage near Port Royal. They and their family were regular attendants and devout members of the Lutheran Church.

Christian Bender and Daniel McConnell, a brother in law, while the latter lived in his mountain home near the sawmill in the early 60's, kept more stands of bees than any other resident of Turbett Township. Both kept them in upright box hives, the best in use preceding the introduction a few years later of the Langstroth movable comb hive.

The family of Christian and Pricilla Bender consisted of four children:

1. Alice Jane 1855 - 1887.
2. William Huston Bender b. Mar 22, 1858, Farmer, Lutheran, upon attaining manhood lived a few years at Tiffin, Ohio; and in 1899 located at Church's Ferry, N.D. In 1914 he returned to Port Royal.
3. John Chambers Bender b. April 21, 1863, Farmer, Lutheran and single, in 1896 located near Wolford, N.D. where he became the owner of 240 acres of land.
4. Mary Ellen, twin with John, died at 16 in 1879.

Pricilla, wife of Christian, died at 56, October 20, 1880. On June 15, 1882 Christian married as his second wife, Mary E. Megaughey b. March 24, 1851. Christian died at 78, July 22, 1903 and was buried beside his wife Pricilla at Church Hill. Mary died November 4, 1913.

5. Luther Amos Bender born March 30, 1885, works for the Railroad, a Methodist, in 1909 married Mary Horning and lives at McAfeestown, near Port Royal, had three children.

6. Clara May b. July 30, 1887, in 1909 married Jacob S. Dalton, works for the Railroad, a Methodist, and lives at Port Royal. One child died as an infant.

Christian Bender in his youth learned the art of making oak shingles and flour barrels from his father. Later he served many of his neighbors annually as a boss-butcher. Traveling on foot by the light of the morning stars to these butchering bees, he and other assistants would arrive sufficiently early that the breakfast could be eaten and the work of slaughtering the fatten pigs began at the first approach of the morning light.

He was a very successful hunter of squirrels, wild bees and deer. The author, in his youth, as a learner enjoyed a days hunt for each of these three kinds of game with Christian; and during the summer of 1875, following the author's graduation from college, Christian aided him in quarrying the rock at the east end of Limestone Ridge, and building a limes stack of 2000 bushels, most of which was applied to the Flickinger farm that fall.

Living in or near the timber, Christian became so familiar with the habits of game that he seemed to know just whereto go and how to see it quickly. He seldom failed to capture what he saw. His greatly prized rifle, which quickly aimed by his quick eye and steady hand, never failed to bring down the little squirrels from the tallest treetops.

Occasionally, accompanied by several others, he hunted deer in the Blacklog Mountains in the Northwest part of the County. This famous hunting ground, at the head waters of Licking Creek, consisted of a series of a half dozen low mountains or ridges, having between them narrow valleys, covered with timber and occasional thickets of underbrush. Only a few families lived in the timber at that time, and their location was in the valley north of Shade Mountain.

In December 1864 accompanied by John Weimer, Samuel R. McMeen, Robert Flickinger and two others, he made a record hunt by securing three deer and one bear in three days. Two of the deer where shot within an hour of each other on the second morning. The bear hunt, which occurred the last forenoon, was intensely interesting to every member of the party. The course that morning, one mile abreast, was eastwardly down the valley between the first and second ridges north of Shade Mountain.

About an hour after starting, while Flickinger, at the south end of the line, was tracing the foot of the first ridge north of Shade Mountain, he happened to meet John Dillon and Wm McKinley, two noted hunters, of that section. During the two days previous they had been vainly trailing several bears back and forth over the mountains in a foot of snow; and they were quite sure the bears were in the next valley south. Though the courtesy of Captain John Howell, Major Flickinger had enjoyed several hunts with these hunters and always returned with a deer. At their suggestion the members of our party were called together and accompanied Dillon and McKinley to the top of the ridge. There, looking south, they pointed out the place in the valley below, where they thought the bears were located.

While they were quietly assigning positions to our squad of hunters so as to surround the bears, Bender happened to see them, three in number, in the valley directly below walking slowly eastward, one behind the other, the two hindmost carefully stepping in the footprints of the first one. Without waiting for assignment he quickly slipped away from the company, ran eastward half a mile along the brow of the ridge and quietly descended into the narrow valley in front of the bears. Concealing himself behind a large oak tree he awaited their approach. he got the first glimpse of them when the front one climbed over a log about a hundred yards in front of him. When the second one came into view on the log, it fell under the deadly aim of his trusty rifle. Before he could reload the other two bears scampered hastily and safely north, back over the ridge they and we had last crossed.

According to the rules of the game, the noted hunters who planned the hunt were entitled to half the meat. They were glad enough to get some bear meat, but were deeply chagrined over the fact that Bender carried of the hide.

In as much as a son and daughter of William Bender, a Cooper and Lutheran who lived in Port Royal, son of John, the ancestor of the Benders in the Tuscarora Valley, married descendents of Zachariah Rice his family of five is here noted:

1. Christian b. May 27, 1825 married Pricilla Saylor
2. John, Twin, b. Feb. 18, 1827
3. Martin, Twin, b. Feb. 18, 1827
4. Julia Ann married Peter Kilmer
5. George Hamlin b. July 26, 1835

Pages 302, 303, 304, The Flickinger Family History, Rev. Robert E. Flickinger Sucess Composition & Printing Co., Des Moines, IA, 1927.

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