Thursday, January 17, 2013

Martin Nicholas Graffius 1722-1790


Martin Nicholas Grafius
Birth May 2, 1722 in Standing stone, of Standing stone, Pennsylvania, USA
Death May 20, 1790 in Standing stone, Pennsylvania, USA
married
Anna Catharine
Born
Died  January 12, 1845

Children:

Nicholas, Peter, Rebecca, John, 
Abraham
Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine, Martin, and Jacob

"The Graffius family is one of the most widely known families of Huntingdon
county, and its numerous descendants are now widely settled throughout
central Pennsylvania. Martin Nicholas Graffius, the founder of the family,
was born May 2, 1722, and died May 20, 1790. His eleven children, who were
born between 1746 and 1770, were: Nicholas, Peter, Rebecca, John, Abraham,
Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine, Martin, and Jacob." From the Biographical Sketch of H. Price Graffius

Timeline
1722 2 May - Birth
Nicholas's family lived in France but were not French.

Bef. 1749 - Marriage
He married Anna Catharine. They had two sons by the time they came to America. 

1749 Arrival
Age: 27
Germantown, Pennsylvania 
   According to rumor, Nicholas took the money that was intended to buy his exemption from service in the German army for their passage to America.  They sailed to Rotterdam in Holland on the ship EDINBURGH and arrived at Philadelphia Pa. on Sept 15, 1749.  It was necessary at that time for all males over 16 to take an oath of allegiance in order to gain admittance into the country and "Nicklas Grusius" was one of the group who took the oath.  
The EDINBURGH carried 380 passengers from Rotterdam with a stop at Portsmouth, England and on to Philadelphia.  They went first to Germantown, which is now part of Philadelphia.  From there they went to York Co. and made a home for themselves and stayed for 20 years.

1785 - Residence
Age: 63
York, York, Pennsylvania 
Listed on a PA Tax & Exoneration List

1790  - Residence
Age: 68
Residence -Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, United States 
1790 United States Federal Census about Nicholas Griffes
Name: Nicholas Griffes
[Nicholas Graffius] 
[Nicholas Griffis] 
Home in 1790 (City, County, State): Huntingdon, Pennsylvania
Free White Persons - Males - Under 16: 3
Free White Persons - Males - 16 and over: 1
Free White Persons - Females: 6
Number of Household Members: 10
1790 20 May - Death
Age: 68

Standing stone, Pennsylvania, USA 

Research:
Emmigrated from Switzerland to Philadelphia, Pa. on Sept. 15, 1749, on the ship "Edinbburgh", then settled in York, Pa.
History of Huntingdon and Blair Co. Pa. by J. Simpson Africa, p. 417
THE GRAFFIUS STORY-Nicholas's family lived in France but were not French.  They had two sons by the time they came to America.  According to rumor, Nicholas took the money that was intended to buy his exemption from service in the German army for their passage to America.  He married Anna Catharine. They sailed to Rotterdam in Holland on the ship EDINBURGH and arrived at Philadelphia Pa. on Sept 15, 1749.  It was necessary at that time for all males over 16 to take an oath of allegiance in order to gain admittance into the country and "Nicklas Grusius" was one of the group who took the oath.  The EDINBURGH carried 380 passengers from Rotterdam with a stop at Portsmouth, England and on to Philadelphia.  They went first to Germantown, which is now part of Philadelphia.  From there they went to York Co. and made a home for themselves and stayed for 20 years.  It was here that the rest of the children were born and many of them were married.  York Co. was at this time very prominent in the plans of the American Revolution and it was at the York Co. Court House that the American Congress assembled during the gloomiest period of the war.  Much of the war was fought in this vicinity.  The Graffis family was drawn into the conflict as the boys served in the York Battalion.Nicholas and Anne then moved to Standing Stone, now part of Huntingdon, PA and where they remained for the rest of their lives.  
The Graffius Story by Beatrice Kingsley 19831790 Census PA, York, p. 282

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Nicholas settled on the Robert Myton place and was among the first of the Shaver's Creek Pioneers.  He bought 300 acres of land to which he came in the spring.  With split rails he mad a sort of pen in which to live during the summer.  by the time winter came he had built a small log cabin with clapboards for a door, holes in the walls for windows and one in the roof for a chimney.  Mr. Graffius cleared his farm and farmed it for eight or ten years.  Then because of troublesome Indians, the family was obliged to remove over the border to Maryland.  A year later they returned.  They came back in one of the first wagons to make it across the mountainous terrain.  Soon after they sold their land in Porter twp and bought 240 acres in Shaver's Creek, now West twp.  On this property he built a small log cabin , which in a course of a few years, had to give way to a larger one, the last house in which the builder lived. He cleared a great portion of his land, cultivated it, raised stock and was something of a hunter besides.  He added a distillery to his other industries.
  He died on July 22, 1822 and is buried in Union Graveyard at Monorhill, six miles from his home.  Elizabeth survived him 23 years, dying on January 12, 1845 and is buried beside her husband.  
(from THE GRAFFIUS STORY) 
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BIO: John GRAFFIUS, Huntingdon County, PA Contributed for use in the USGenWeb Archives by JO Copyright 2008. All rights reserved. http://www.usgwarchives.net/copyright.htm http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/huntingdon/ http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/huntingdon/runk/bios-runk.htm __________________________________________________________________ Commemorative Biographical Encyclopedia of the Juniata Valley: Comprising the Counties of Huntingdon, Mifflin, Juniata and Perry, Pennsylvania, Containing Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens and Many of the Early Settlers. Chambersburg, Pa.: J. M. Runk & Co., 1897, pages 229-230. __________________________________________________________________ JOHN GRAFFIUS, Petersburg, Huntingdon county, Pa., was born in the valley of Shavers Creek, August 18, 1815. He is a son of Martin and Margaret (McGuire) Graffius. Nicholas Martin Graffius, founder of the family in America, and great-grandfather of John Graffius, emigrated with his family from his native province in continental Europe, in 1750, and settled in York, Pa. The family was of the Huguenot faith. After a residence of twenty years in York, they removed to the spot then called Standing Stone, Bedford county, but now within the borough of Huntingdon. Here Nicholas Martin Graffius died. His eldest son, Nicholas, was not more than a boy when he came to this country. When Nicholas reached manhood, he married Elizabeth Correll, of York, who was of German descent, and fixed his residence on the Juniata river, within the present limits of Porter township. He had bought 300 acres of land, to which he came in the spring; with split rails he made a sort of pen in which to live during the summer. By the time winter came he had built a small log cabin with clapboards for a door, holes in the walls for windows, and one in the roof for a chimney. Mr. Graffius cleared his land, and farmed it for eight or ten years. Then, the Indians becoming troublesome, the family was obliged to remove to Maryland. A year later they returned to their primitive homestead in one of the first wagons ever brought into this region. Soon after, Mr. Graffius sold his land in Porter township and bought 240 acres on Shavers Creek, now in West township. On this property he built a small log house which, in the course of a few years, had to give place to a larger one - the last house in which its builder lived. He cleared a great portion of his land, raised stock, besides cultivating it, and was something of a hunter besides. He added a distillery to his other industries. Mr. Graffius was a Whig. His children were: Catherine; Mary; Jacob; Margaret; Martin; Abraham; Susanna; Elizabeth; Esther; Charlotte; Lydia; and five that died in early childhood. Nicholas Graffius died in West township, August 22, 1822; his wife died January 23, 1843. Martin, son of Nicholas Graffius, attended subscription schools which were as homely as the rough but healthy life of this pioneer family. But primitive as his surroundings doubtless were, he learned to read and write well. He was a farmer and distiller; owned and cultivated over 200 acres in what is now Henderson township, and was also a stock raiser. He built himself a house and a barn. Mr. Graffius was a Whig; he cast his first presidential vote for Thomas Jefferson. He was in the army during the war of 1812. Martin Graffius was a hardy and industrious man, just the right one for a pioneer; he was successful in his undertakings, and was liked and respected in his neighborhood. His wife Margaret, daughter of Hugh and Patience (Lyon) McGuire, was born in Doe Run, Chester county, Pa. Mr. McGuire was a farmer of French and Irish descent, and her mother was of a family of English Friends. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Graffius were: Nicholas, deceased; Elizabeth, deceased, wife of D. Harris; Jacob, died in Indiana in 1845; Abraham, died in 1878; Matilda, deceased, wife of David Kessler; John; Margaret, deceased, wife of Andrew Neff; Margaret, died young; George, died young; and one that died in infancy. Mr. Graffius attended the Presbyterian church. Martin Graffius was born in Frederick, Md., in 1781, and died in Henderson township, Huntingdon county, in 1853. John Graffius attended subscription schools in the log school house, as his father had also done. He farmed on the homestead until he was twenty-seven, besides working as a "Hand" for neighboring farmers. At that age, he came to Petersburg, and worked for some time as a carpenter. Selling out his interest, he removed to North Henderson, Warren county, Ill., where he bought a farm and cultivated it for four years. On account of his wife's ill health, Mr. Graffius sold his farm, returned to Huntingdon county, and came to reside in Petersburg, where in 1875 he bought a handsome brick dwelling; this house he altered and beautified; he has since worked at carpentry. Mr. Graffius was justice of the peace for fifteen years, besides serving the township as tax collector, and for several years in the school board. His politics are Democratic. His life presents a record of honorable industry and fair dealing, and he is a highly respected member of the community. John Graffius was first married in 1843, in West township, to Margaret, daughter of Alexander Steel, a farmer of Scotch-Irish descent; she was born in Derry, Ireland. All of their three children died in their infancy. Mrs. Graffius died in Petersburg in March, 1878. Mr. Graffius, in December, 1879, married Sarah, daughter of Lewis and Elizabeth (Thompson) Hutchinson; she was born at Shavers Creek; her father was a farmer, and of Scotch-Irish extraction. The marriage took place at Petersburg. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Graffius are: Jane S.; Margaret; John L.; and one that died very young. Mr. Graffius is a member of the Presbyterian church, and a teacher in the Sunday-school.

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 Nicholas was a sharpshooter in the First Battalion of York Co. under General Daniel Morgan. 
On 6 September 1770, Nicholas and Peter bought 2271/2 acres of land on the south east side of the Juniata River from James Patterson.  In Barree twp.,
 in 1774, he is charged with 70 acres 1 horse, 1 cow and Peter with a like amount.  (Listed as  CRAWPHES). 
 By 1776, he has 15 acres of his 70 improved and 2 horses, 1 cow.  Peter has "a like amount."  (listed as CRAFF) 
on 6 Dec. 1778, Mary Patterson deeded land to Peter and Nicholas "CRAFIS".  
On 10 Jan., 1785, Nicholas CRAFISH and his wife, Elizabeth deeded his interest in the land to David Musselman and moved to Shaver's Creek, where they settled on Robert Myton's place and were among the first settlers.  He bought 300 acres of land.  He bult a small log cabin with clapboards for a door, holes in the walls for windows and a hole in the roof for a chimney.  
At one time they were forced from their home by Indians and went across the border to Maryland, returning by wagon a year later.  They then sold their land in Porter twp and bought 240 acres in West Township. 
He is buried at Union Cemetery, Manorhill about 6 miles from his home.  Elizabeth is buried beside him.  
He was a Whig and successful farmer and also operated a distillery. 
Sources: J. Simpson Africa, History of Huntingdon and Blair Counties, Pa. p.309, p.403 

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