Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Brown's In Mifflin Twp, Columbia County Pa




HIRAM H. BROWN is one of the honored and prominent farmers of Scott township, Columbia County, Pa., and is also successfully engaged in raising and selling the Italian honey bee. He was born in Mifflin township, Columbia County, June 29, 1837, and is a son of John and Jane (Hutchison) Brown.
There is in the Brown family an old Bible and on a fly-leaf the following lines were written by James Brown, the great-great-great-grandfather of our subject: "England is my native land and Long Island my home," and dated 1716. He probably moved to Hainesburg, N. J., and there spent his remaining days, at least his son John, the great-great-grandfather of our subject, resided there and was the owner of considerable property. The latter built an old stone house and above the door appears the date 1789; this ancient building is still being used and is owned by a Mr. Brugler, one of his descendants. John Brown disposed of his property in the state of New Jersey and moved to Mifflin township, Columbia County, Pa., and purchased a large tract of land four miles east-of the town of Mifflin. Finding his purchase unsuitable for farming land he sold the property and bought what is now known as the Rosebud farm, which is in Mifflin township. In addition to farming he was a gunsmith and blacksmith by trade; he served throughout the Revolutionary War, and besides doing the duties of a regular soldier, he shod the horses in camp and repaired guns. He was treasurer of the Nescopeck Bridge Company at Berwick, Pa., as is shown by a share of stock, No. 105, now in possession of his great-grandson, the subject of this sketch, which share is dated August 6, 1814. He was twice married and was the father of five children, namely: James, Samuel, Mary, Elizabeth, and Sarah.
Samuel Brown, the grandfather of our subject, was reared on his father's farm, and was a farmer and miller. He operated what is now known as the Brown Mills which were supposed to have been erected by his father. He was wedded to Dortha Nice of Philadelphia, and they reared the following children: John, the father of our subject; Mary Margaret, who was the wife of Samuel Creasy of Mifflin township, both now deceased; Sarah, deceased, was the wife of George A. Bowman, also of Scott township; William N., deceased, was formerly a farmer of Mifflin township, but later owned the Brown Mills,— he is the father of James C. Brown, editor of one of Bloomsburg's most flourishing papers; Mathew, late a farmer of Mifflin township; James, deceased, who was a boatman on the Schuylkill Canal; Elizabeth, who wedded Alexander Thompson of Berwick, Columbia County; George B., deceased, who was a dentist and book and stationery dealer of Danville, Pa.; and Elisha, late a merchant of Mifflin.
John Brown, the father of our subject, carried on farming and operated the Brown Mills during his early manhood, and was also engaged in the mercantile business at Mifflin. He was a very prominent member of his community and took much interest in public affairs. Politically he was an old line Whig. He passed from this life February 21, 1855. He was twice married and by his first wife, Mary Freas, a family of three children was reared, namely: Samuel, deceased, who was engaged in farming on the homestead; Freas, deceased, who started in life as a miller but later embarked in the mercantile business at Columbus, Pa.; and William, who died in his infancy. His second marriage was to Jane Hutchison, whose father was a well-to-do farmer of Center township, Columbia County. As a result of this union two sons andt two daughters were born, namely: Margaret M., the wife of Hiram B. Freas, who reside in Chicago, Ill.; our subject; Elizabeth, wife of William Hill, a farmer of Center township, Columbia County; and Mark, who died in his boyhood days.
Hiram H. Brown was reared upon the farm until he was eleven years of age, when his father moved to Mifflin. Our subject was educated in the public and select schools of Bloomsburg, commenced teaching at the age of seventeen years, and taught twelve winters; during the summers of 1855-56 he attended the Dickinson Seminary at Williamsport, Pa. In 1857 he located at Limeridge, Columbia County, where he was engaged in the lumber business until 1865. In the spring of 1866 he moved upon the old Britton homestead and has since been engaged in the cultivation of the soil; he also deals extensively in Italian bees, and in bee colonies, combs, foundations and extractors.
Mr. Brown was one of the chief organizers of the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company, which entered upon its business career December 29, 1874, and on January 11, 1875, he was elected vice-president of the company, and has held that office fourteen years. January 11, 1892, he was elected secretary, which office he still holds. During the time when the Farmers' Grange flourished in this section, he was one of its most active supporters; was deputy grand master of Columbia and Luzerne counties from 1873 to 1880, and during that period he assisted in organizing twenty-seven local Granges. In 1860 he joined Mountain Lodge, I. O. O. F., and in 1870 withdrew to become a charter member of the Espy Lodge, No. 681, of which he is now past grand master; in 1863 he was elected to membership in Washington Lodge, No. 265, F. & A. M., of Bloomsburg; is a charter member of Camp No. 17, P. O. S. of A., of Light Street, and was district president of the same in 1895. In religious views Mr. Brown is an active member of the Methodist Church. He was school director three years and assessor of the township eighteen years. On March 21, 1861, Mr. Brown and Elizabeth Conner were united in the bonds of matrimony, and they are the parents of three children, namely: Eber A., a mechanic of Light Street, who married Anna E. Beers of Bloomsburg, Pa., and they have a son, Claude C., born October 7, 1898; Morse, who died in infancy; and Hannah J., who married H. W. Black of White Hall, Pa., and they have one child, Edith. The Conner family is of Irish descent. John Conner, the grandfather of Mrs. Hiram Brown, was a well known tanner and farmer of Center township, Columbia County, and was one of the wealthiest men in that section of the state. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Conner was twice married; his first wife was Miss Hill who bore him the following children: Mary; Thomas; Samuel; Isaiah; John; and Charles. His second wife was Elizabeth Nyer and two children resulted from this union, Joseph P. and Rebecca. Thomas Conner, the father of our subject's wife, was born in Center township where he was engaged in farming all his life. He died in September, 1862, at the age of fifty-four years. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. He formed a matrimonial alliance with Hannah Laubach, a daughter of Frederick Laubach, a farmer of Benton township, Columbia County. To this union three sons and two daughters were born: John Freas, a farmer residing in Kansas; George, a farmer of Scott township; Elizabeth, the wife of our subject; Alfred, deceased, who worked in a supply house and furniture store at Cape May, N. J.; and Mary Catherine, wife of W. S. Conner, a resident of Trenton, N. J.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District, Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY: 1899. Consisting of Columbia, Montour, Northumberland and Sullivan Counties Pg.147 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

1860 Census
Name: Hiram Brown
Age in 1860: 22
Birth Year: abt 1838
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1860: Centre, Columbia, Pennsylvania
Gender: Male
Post Office: Lime Ridge
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
Lavina Hutchison 43
Clarissa J Hutchison 9
Arthur Hutchison 4
Hannah Applin 16
Hiram Brown 22

1880 Census

Name: Hiram H. Brown
Age: 42
Birth Year: abt 1838
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1880: Scott, Columbia, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Elisabeth Brown
Father's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Neighbors: View others on page
Occupation: Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
Hiram H. Brown 42
Elisabeth Brown 41
Eber A. Brown 18
Hannah J. Brown 6
Carrie Hill 17


1900 Census

Name: Hiram Brown
[Hiram H Brown] 
Age: 62
Birth Date: Jun 1837
Birthplace: Mifflin Twp
[Pennsylvania] 
Home in 1900: West Scott, Columbia, Pennsylvania
[Columbia] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Elizabeth Brown
Marriage Year: 1861
Years married: 39
Father's Birthplace: Mifflin Twp
Mother's Birthplace: Centre Twp
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Hiram Brown 62
Elizabeth Brown 61
Freaz Harman 18

1910 Census

Name: Hiram H Brown
Age in 1910: 72
Birth Year: 1838
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1910: Scott, Columbia, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
[Self (Head)] 
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Hiram H Brown 72
Lena K Faust 33
Raymond H Faust 12
Myra B Halfpenny 15
Harry John 19




JAMES C. BROWN, a gentleman prominent in public affairs in and about Bloomsburg, is the proprietor and editor of the Columbia County Republican, a well-edited and influential paper of the county. He is a civil engineer by profession and for the past six years or more has been acting in that capacity for the borough of Blooms-burg. He is a son of William N. and Loretta (Yonker) Brown, and was born in' Mifflin township, Columbia County, Pa., April 29, 1848. He comes of a prominent old English family and is descended from John Brown, who emigrated from England prior to our struggle for independence and located on Long Island.
John Brown subsequently moved to Warren County, N. J., and later located with his family in Mifflin township, in what was then Northumberland County, now Columbia County, in the year 1794. He followed his trade, that of a blacksmith, there during the remainder of his life; he served in that capacity for the American Army during the Revolutionary War. For many years he served as justice of the peace. His son, Samuel Brown, grandfather of our subject, was born in Warren County, N. J., and moved to Mifflin township, with the rest of the family, making that his home throughout life. His father having purchased 600 acres of land there, upon his death divided it among four of his children, Samuel receiving the old homestead. This he cultivated until his death in 1823, at the age of forty-five years. He married Dorothy Nice, by whom he had a family of nine children, as follows: John, deceased; Margaret, deceased, was the wife of Samuel Creasy, now deceased; Sarah, wife of George A. Bowman; William N.; Mathew; James; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Alexander Thompson; George B.; and Elisha B., all of whom are deceased.
William N. Brown was born in Mifflin township, Columbia County, on the old homestead, February 15, 1807, and took up the vocation of a farmer. He continued in that line of work with good results until 1870, when he moved to the village of Mifflinville, renting his farm. He built a house and lived in peaceful retirement until his demise, September 16, 1876. For many years he also conducted a grist and flouring mill. Religiously he was an active member in the Methodist Episcopal Church, holding various offices, among them steward and trustee. He married Nancy Freas, a daughter of John Freas of Center township, Columbia County, and they had five children: George A., deceased; Albert, a farmer of Ottawa County, Kans.; John F., who lived on the old homestead in Mifflin township until 1898, when he, because of ill health, retired from farming and moved to Mifflinville; Almira, of Mifflinville; and Dorcas, deceased. Mrs. Brown died in 1845 and he formed a second alliance in 1847 with Loretta Yonker, a daughter of Henry Yonk-er, a native of Germany, who, upon coming to this country, located in Mifflinville, Pa. This marriage resulted in the following offspring: James C, the subject of this personal history; Martha, deceased; Samuel C., employed in the Railway Postal Service between New York and Pittsburg; Malissa J., deceased; and Victoria, the wife of George W. Hess of Bloomsburg, Pa.
James C. Brown received his preparatory education in the public and select schools' of Mifflinville, after which he entered the Dickinson Seminary at Williamsport, Pa., graduating therefrom in 1868. He then began teaching, accepting a position as professor in the State Normal School at Bloomsburg, which he held for three and one-half years, the last half year of which he was principal. In the spring of 1872 he engaged as civil engineer in locating the N. & W. Branch Railroad and was associated with the enterprise until its completion in 1882 as a member of the board of directors, as well as engineer. He also did work in that line for other railroad companies during that time and since has followed that as his profession. He has been engineer of the borough of Bloomsburg for six or eight years and has frequently rendered service to other boroughs in the vicinity. Being a man of much experience, he is frequently called into court to give expert testimony on civil engineering in damage suits. In September, 1875, he purchased the plant of the Columbia County Republican, a four-page, eight-column publication, which makes its appearance weekly, and has since edited it. It is Republican in politics and has a large following, having a good circulation throughout the county, and also in adjoining counties.
Mr. Brown is one of the Republican leaders in his section and is indefatigable in his efforts to bring success to the party. He is frequently a delegate to state conventions, and was a delegate from what was then the Eleventh Congressional District of Pennsylvania to the Republican National Convention at Chicago in 1884. He also speaks for the state committee during the campaigns. He made a tour of the state as a member of Gen. Hastings' staff during the gubernatorial contest in which Gen. Hastings was a candidate. He is a fluent and convincing speaker and is well versed on all subjects of interest to the people. He is now president of the board of school directors and has been a member of that body for almost twenty years. He is also a director of the Bloomsburg School Furnishing Company and of the Bloomsburg Steam Heating Company, and a trustee of the State Normal School, being vice-president of the board. He is a member and treasurer of the Columbia County Agricultural Society. Religiously he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and is very active in church work. For some fifteen or twenty years he has been secretary of the board of trustees. Mr. Brown is a man of high character, and no other in the county is held in higher esteem.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District, Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY: 1899. Consisting of Columbia, Montour, Northumberland and Sullivan Counties Pg.132 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
J. C. BROWN, editor and proprietor of the Columbia County Bepublican, Bloomsburg, is a native of Mifflinville, Columbia Co., Penn., born April 89, 1848, a son of William N. and Loretta (Yonker) Brown. He was reared to the life of a farmer until about sixteen years of age, attending the schools of his township and a seminary at his native place. At the above age he became a student in Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, from which he graduated in the classical course in 1868, with the highest honors of his class. Thafryear he accepted a position as teacher in the Bloomsburg Literary Institute, which subsequently was merged into the State normal school, and where he remained until January, 1878, serving the last year as principal. He then engaged in civil engineering and was on the original survey for the North & West Branch Railroad, of which he was director six or eight years, and is still connected with the profession of engineering. August 1, 1875, he bought the office, presses and other material from E. M. Wardin, of the Bepublican, and has since conducted that paper. It is an eight-column quarto, and has a circulation of upward of 1,800; is Republican in politics as its name indicates. Mr. Brown is now a member of the board of directors for the proposed New York, Bloomsburg & Western Railroad; has served the town as member of the school board nine years; is a member of the Methodist Church, and has been for several years a member of the board of trustees; is treasurer of the Columbia County Agricultural Society; is one of the managers of the school furnishing company; a director of the steam heating company. In 1884 he was elected and served as a delegate t© the National Republican Convention at Chicago. Mr. Brown's ancestors were of Scotch descent, immigrated to America in the early part of the eighteenth century and settled on Long Island, afterward moving to Warren County, N- J. His great-great-grandfather, James Brown, was born November 13, 1718. His children were John Brown, born June 85, 1746; James. Martha, Sarah, Daniel and Charity. John Brown was a blacksmith by trade and served as a soldier in the war of the Revolution. His first wife, Mary (Brugler) Brown, died in Warren County, N. J., Octobers, 1793. He married for his second wife Mrs. Margaret Haines, October 81, 1794, and removed to Columbia County, Penn. He and his family settled about one mile south of Mifflinville in 1795, where he bought a mile square and resided until his death, September 24, 1819. He had five children, all by his first marriage: James; Samuel, born April 8, 1778, married Dorothy Nice, died October 13, 1833; Mary, who married Joseph Otto and moved to McKean County, Penn., where she died; Elizabeth, who married George Hess and moved to Benton Township, this county, where she died; Sarah married Henry Bowman and lived and died in Mifflin Township, this county. Samuel, above mentioned, was the grandfather of Mr. J. C. Brown, and at his father's death inherited the homestead. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Bloomsburg, pg. 326 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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